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Damage Control Symposium - Destruction in Art, 2013-11-25T19:10:08.000Z

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Yoko Ono's "Wish Tree", From July 1 through Labor Day, visitors are invited to the sculpture garden to tie their written wishes to the branches of Yoko Ono’s “Wish Tree for Washington, DC,” (2007). For most of the year, visitors may whisper their wishes to this Japanese dogwood. A summer favorite at the Hirshhorn, Wish Tree connects audiences as they reflect on hopes for the future. Hirshhorn staff collect the wishes throughout each summer and send them to Ono’s “Imagine Peace Tower” in Reykjavik, Iceland. Learn more: hirshhorn.si.edu/bio/wish-tree-washington/, 774, 46 sec

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Yoko Ono, American, b. Tokyo, Japan, 1933

Live tree and mixed media, dimensions variable

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of the artist, 2007

Accession Number: 07.6

The artist, New York, to 15 February 1007, Gift of the artist, 2007, HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE GARDEN, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. Installed in sculpture garden, 2 April 2007-present., DAWSON, JESSICA. "Yoko Ono's Peaceful Message Takes Root," Washington Post (3 April 2007), online edition., KELLY, JOHN. "Every Week is Harvest Season for the Hirshhorn's Wish Tree," Washington Post (25 August 2011), Metro section, p. B2.

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden Collection

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Live tree and mixed media, dimensions variable

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, Gift of the artist, 2007

Accession Number: 07.6

Damage Control Symposium - Destruction in Art, October 26, 2013 This panel discussion with Yoko Ono and Raphael Montañez Ortiz, participants in the original 1966 Destruction in Art Symposium; artist Monica Bonvicini; and art historian Dario Gamboni will explore the ways in which artists have used destruction as a means of responding to cultural and social issues., 2,189, 1 hr 42 min 27 sec

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