Hirshhorn Plaza

Upcoming

LEE UFAN: OPEN DIMENSION
SEPTEMBER 27, 2019–SEPTEMBER 13, 2020
Curated by Anne Reeve
Organized by the Hirshhorn
(Plaza)

Lee Ufan , Relatum – Stage, 2018 . Installation view, Serpentine Gallery, London (6 February – 29 July 2018). © Lee Ufan. Photograph © Ian Gavan/Getty Images

Lee Ufan, Relatum – Stage, 2018. Installation view, Serpentine Gallery, London (6 February – 29 July 2018). © Lee Ufan.
Photograph © Ian Gavan/Getty Images

The Hirshhorn has commissioned an ambitious site-specific installation by the celebrated Korean artist Lee Ufan. The expansive installation will feature approximately 10 new sculptures from the artist’s signature and continuing “Relatum” series and marks the artist’s largest site-specific outdoor sculpture project in the U.S. It is the first exhibition of Lee’s work in the nation’s capital, and the first time in the museum’s 44-year history that its 4.3-acre outdoor plaza will be devoted entirely to the work of a single artist.

Each of the sculptures will be created in response to the museum’s unique architecture, and will continue Lee’s iconic practice of placing contrasting materials, such as stainless steel plates and boulders, in dialogue with one another to heighten awareness of the world, in Lee’s words, “exactly as it is.” Leaving the materials relatively unaltered, Lee arranges them with careful attention to the subtle nuances of the site in order to foreground the visitor’s encounter with the art as it unfolds in time and space.

 

PAT STEIR: COLOR WHEEL
OCTOBER 24, 2019–SEPTEMBER 7, 2020
Curated by Evelyn Hankins
Organized by the Hirshhorn
(Second Level)

Pat Steir in her studio. Photo: Jean-François Juassaud. Courtesy Lévy Gorvy.

Pat Steir in her studio. Photo: Jean-François Juassaud. Courtesy Lévy Gorvy.

The Hirshhorn will host the largest site-specific exhibition to date by the acclaimed abstract painter Pat Steir. The exhibition is an expansive new suite of paintings by the artist, spanning the entire perimeter of the museum’s second-floor inner-circle galleries, extending nearly 400 linear feet. These immersive works will transform the museum into a vibrant spectrum of color. The 30 large-scale paintings, when presented together as a group, will create an immense color wheel that shifts hues with each painting, with the pours on each canvas often appearing in the complementary hue of the monochrome background.

 

MARCEL DUCHAMP: THE BARBARA AND AARON LEVINE COLLECTION
Curated by Evelyn Hankins
Organized by the Hirshhorn
(Third Level)

Marcel Duchamp The Box in a Valise/Boite en Valise (Series E) From or by Marcel Duchamp or Rrose Sélavy [de ou par Marcel Duchamp ou Rrose Sélavy] 1963 Green leather valise containing miniature replicas, photographs, and colour reproductions of works by Duchamp valise 15 7/8 x 14 7/8 x 3 5/8 in. (40.3 x 37.8 x 9.2 cm) Cincinnati Art Museum, Ohio, USA / Gift of Anne W. Harrison and Family in memory of Agnes Sattler Harrison and Alexina "Teeny" Sattler Duchamp / Bridgeman Images 15 3/4 × 14 3/4 × 3 1/2 in. (40 × 37.5 × 8.9 cm) © Association Marcel Duchamp / ADAGP, Paris / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2018

Marcel Duchamp, “The Box in a Valise/Boite en Valise (Series E) From or by Marcel Duchamp or Rrose Sélavy [de ou par Marcel Duchamp ou Rrose Sélavy],” 1963. © Association Marcel Duchamp / ADAGP, Paris / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 2018

“Marcel Duchamp: The Barbara and Aaron Levine Collection” will feature the recent gift of over 50 major historical artworks, including more than 35 seminal works by Duchamp, promised to the museum by Washington, D.C., collectors Barbara and Aaron Levine. The first stage of a two-part show on the life and legacy of Marcel Duchamp, the exhibition comprises an unparalleled selection of artworks, thoughtfully acquired over the course of two decades and offering a rarely seen view of the entire arc of Duchamp’s career.

 

On View

MANIFESTO: ART X AGENCY
JUNE 15, 2019–JANUARY 5, 2020
Curated by Stéphane Aquin
Organized by the Hirshhorn
(Second Level)

Still from Julian Rosefeldt’s Manifesto, 2015 © Julian Rosefeldt and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019

Still from Julian Rosefeldt’s “Manifesto,” 2015 © Julian Rosefeldt and VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2019

“Manifesto: Art x Agency” is a group exhibition that examines the art historical impact of artist manifestos from the 20th century to present day. The exhibition will include Julian Rosefeldt’s “Manifesto,” presented as a multichannel film installation for the first time in Washington, D.C., alongside a diverse selection of works from the museum’s permanent collection. Comprising more than 100 works of art and ephemera created over a hundred-year period, “Manifesto: Art x Agency” explores how artists used manifestos to engage with the political and social issues of their time and how contemporary practices still employ art as a tool in the making of history.

 

THE EVIDENCE ROOM
JUNE 12–SEPTEMBER 8, 2019
Curated by Betsy Johnson
Organized by the Hirshhorn
(Third Level)

Interior perspective of “The Evidence Room.” Photo by Fred Hunsberger, University of Waterloo School of Architecture.

Interior perspective of “The Evidence Room.” Photo by Fred Hunsberger, University of Waterloo School of Architecture.

The Evidence Room is an installation that gives visual testament to the atrocities of the Holocaust, drawing on architectural forensic evidence to focus attention on the architecture that made the Auschwitz concentration camp a systematic factory for mass murder. Piecing together information gleaned from blueprints, correspondence and photographs that substantiate eyewitness accounts, the project explores the role of architecture in history, addressing themes around ethics and truth. The Hirshhorn’s presentation of The Evidence Room will mark the installation’s U.S. premiere.

The Evidence Room features three architectural reconstructions, 65 plaster casts that give sculptural form to evidence presented by architectural historian Robert Jan van Pelt in a landmark libel case in London in 2000. Thwarting Nazi attempts to destroy the proof of their crimes and post-war Holocaust denial, the evidence gathered traces the work done by German architects between 1941 and 1943 and points what van Pelt has referred to as the greatest crime ever committed by architects.

 

MARK BRADFORD: PICKETT’S CHARGE
NOVEMBER 12, 2017–NOVEMBER 14, 2021
Curated by Evelyn Hankins and Stéphane Aquin
Organized by the Hirshhorn
(Third Level)

Installation view of Mark Bradford: Pickett’s Charge at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Cathy Carver.

Installation view of Mark Bradford: Pickett’s Charge at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo: Cathy Carver.

Internationally renowned artist Mark Bradford debuted “Pickett’s Charge,” a monumental new, site-specific commission inspired by the immersive form of the cyclorama as well as the museum’s distinctive architecture. The installation, which comprises a series of eight powerful, abstract paintings, each more than 45 feet long, encircles the entire Third Level, creating an immersive, 360-degree experience. Drawing directly from artist Paul Philippoteaux’s landmark 19th-century cyclorama depicting the final charge of the Battle of Gettysburg, “Pickett’s Charge” invites visitors to interrogate conventional historical narratives. Weaving together reproductions of the original 1883 painting with multiple layers of colored paper, Bradford transforms the historic imagery to reveal the hidden textures and complexities lurking just beneath the surface.

“Pickett’s Charge” is Bradford’s first solo exhibition in Washington, and his first major American solo show following his presentation as the U.S. representative for the 57th Venice Biennale.

 

WHAT ABSENCE IS MADE OF
OCTOBER 18, 2017–MARCH 2020
Curated by Gianni Jetzer
Organized by the Hirshhorn
(Third Level)

Ed Atkins
Safe Conduct, 2016
Three channel installation with 5.1 surround sound
Acquisition approved November 2016

“What Absence Is Made Of” presents artworks from the last 65 years that investigate the space between the tangible and the intangible. Selected from the Hirshhorn’s permanent collection, the exhibition highlights new acquisitions by Annette Lemieux, Ed Atkins, and Huang Yong Ping, as well as collection favorites by Ana Mendieta, John Baldessari, Fred Sandback, and Ann Hamilton. The artists featured utilize absence as a powerful component in their work, employing such methods as reduction, erasure, negative space, and monochrome. Focusing on prominent themes in art since the 1960s, the exhibition charts the rising appeal of immateriality in reaction to an increasingly material world.

 

BARBARA KRUGER: BELIEF AND DOUBT
INDEFINITELY
Curated by Melissa Ho
Organized by the Hirshhorn
(Lower Level)

Barbara Kruger: Belief+Doubt

Part of an initiative to bring art to new sites within and around the building, this installation by Barbara Kruger fills the Lower Level lobby and extends into the newly relocated museum bookstore. Famous for her incisive photomontages, Kruger has focused increasingly over the past two decades on creating environments that surround the viewer with language. The entire space—walls, floor, escalator sides—is wrapped in text-printed vinyl, immersing visitors in a spectacular hall of voices, where words either crafted by the artist or borrowed from the popular lexicon address conflicting perceptions of democracy, power, and belief.

At a moment when ideological certitude and purity seem especially valued, Kruger says she’s “interested in introducing doubt.” Large areas of the installation are devoted to open-ended questions, while the section occupying the bookstore explores themes of desire and consumption.